Liquor Inventory Experts

25 ways to Prevent shrinkage at your bar

Man stealing money

Every week we are asked what are the ways bar owners could be losing money. We have come up with the 25 most common ways that your bar could be losing money.

1. Short Ring - Under-ring the correct price of item and pocket the
difference.

2. Phantom Register - Extra register put in bar and items not rung
in on main register.

3. Serve and collect while register is reading between shift
changes.

4. Claim a phony walk-out. Keep money received from
customer.

5. Phantom Bottle - Bartender brings in his own bottle and
pockets cash from the sale.

To get the rest of the list click here

To learn more how Scannabar's alcohol inventory software can start helping you save money today visit use at our website www.scannabar.com

Topics: inventory managers, Bar inventory, bartending schools, wine inventory, free pour, beer inventory, profit

Creating Drink Recipes

Standard Drink Recipe

Drink recipeTo run a successful and have a loyal following, it is important that your customers are served consistent drinks. To do so, standard drink recipes must be prepared so as to prepare your bar staff accordingly. A standard drink recipe is made up of the following:

  • Exact quantity of each ingredient
  • Glass size
  • Procedure to make the drink
  • Garnish
  • Any other special procedures/condiments
  • A picture is an option

For each drink served at your place of business, a standard recipe should be written up and kept on file to train new bartenders and make sure older bartenders do not sway from the company standards.

Standardized recipes will also help control your pour cost percentages and a revision on a 6 month basis is suggested. Below, you will see how to document a standard drink recipe.

      Ingredients                                 Drink: Stinger
      ¾ oz cognac                               Glass: old fashion
      ¾ oz white crème de menthe
 

Procedure 

In an old fashion glass, fill with ice, pour ¾ oz cognac and then ¾ oz white crème de menthe. Add a stir stick.

 Ingredient      Bottle Cost       Cost/oz        Qty      Cost/portion

   Cognac            $30.00            $1.18       3/4oz          $0.89

  Crème/Menthe   $18.00             $0.71      3/4oz          $0.53

Drink Total Cost:  $1.42

Total ounces: 1.50

Selling Price: $7.50

Cost %   18.93%

Date: September 1, 2010 
 
If all your drinks are priced correclty you will always be in line with your costs.

Topics: Bar inventory, free pour, Bar Management, drink recipe, liquor

Bartending School: 10 Questions for Aspiring Bartenders

bartender san francisco 800 resized 600Becoming a Bartender

We all have one point seen ourselves behind the bar slinging drinks like Tom did in his famous movie role. But before we do, there are few things we must consider:

  1. Are we ready to give up our weekends?
  2. Is working late hours something we are comfortable with?
  3. Are we what we call a “people person”?
  4. Can we take orders and remain calm under pressure?
  5. Do we deal with patrons that could become rude and rowdy?

Bartending can be a very lucrative and reward career. For others, it can be a simple sideline job while in school. Whatever it may be, bartending does require certain skills that can be taught in bartending schools and experienced in the line of fire.

A professional bartender understands both the needs of the clients and what is required to become effective during service. A bartender’s quick check list:

  1. Is my liquor inventory up to par?
  2. Is my beer inventory properly stocked?
  3. Are my fruits and condiments prepared?
  4. Do I have enough ice?
  5. Does my till have enough change? 

A bartender knows what can be called the “golden hours” at which point all they do is take orders and serve drinks. To maximize the full potential, preparation is key.

Topics: Bar inventory, Bar staff, bartending schools, Bar Management, Liquor cost, hospitality jobs, Control

The Truth About Liquor Dispensers: Do They Work?

The dictionary meaning of a dispenser is as follows: “a device that automatically dispenses a Liquor Dispensersingle item or a measured quantity” In the hospitality industry, we are sometimes faced with a decision; do we want our liquor to be poured by way of a dispensing unit? Do we want our bartenders to be “automatic” and potentially take away any flair our personable bar staff has to offer our patrons?

Liquor dispensers are designed to specifically pour a pre configured amount in a glass, no more, no less. There can be certain advantages:

  1. Consistency of drinks
  2. Controls over quantity poured
  3. Less bartender training required

Liquor dispensers typically are available in two forms: guns & spigots.

Guns normally entail tubing to be run from the bar to an area where the liquor is poured into small vats. From there, as a product is selected at the bar, the liquor from the liquor room runs along the line into the patrons drinks. Many times, operators will limit the guns to rail product like vodka, gin, rum…or what we call high moving products.

Spigots or what can be best described as “time release valves” are systems in which a ring is placed around a nozzle on the bottle. When a portion of liquor is requested, the bottle is put through the activator ring, the lever is pressed and an electrical courant opens the valve to dispense a portion of liquid.

Although we may perceive these systems as the ultimate controls, there are a few things to consider: 

  1. If you have several pouring stations, they can become cost prohibitive
  2. They can be impersonal: clients still like to see a bartender pour a drink straight into a glass without all the “mechanics” involved
  3. Sweet liquors have a tendency to crystallize and cause back ups in the lines and spigots thus requiring regular maintenance.
  4. Lack of inventory: as much as these systems can dispense exact amounts, they still require a separate system to conduct regular liquor inventories

In the end, as an operator, the decision lies in both the financial areas but also the image and feel you want your establishment to portray, both certainly will have an impact on your business and this is certainly a decision that takes time and research before adapting.  

Topics: liquor inventory, Bar inventory, bar inventory levels, Bar staff, wine inventory, Bar Management, Wine Control, Liquor Inventory savings, inventory counting

Bar Inventory 101

bar inventory managementTaking Control of your bar inventory management

If you have recently made the purchase of a bar inventory management system, you must now understand how the features and benefits your system offers are best suited to your business.

The first thing you must decide on is the frequency at which you will be taking liquor inventory, beer inventory and wine inventory. One thing that cannot be dismissed is the fact the smaller the intervals between inventory periods, the more effective your bar inventory management system can be.

If you own a restaurant, bistro or country club and your liquor, beer and wine sales represent less than 50% of your sales, inventory periods can weekly, bi weekly and potentially monthly.

But if your liquor, beer and wine sales representative a majority of your sales, taking weekly if not daily inventory of your most prized assets should be an automatic. Consider the following; you would be ready to pay a cook and a dishwasher for a full eight hour shift to cook a single hamburger and French fries on a slow business day.

Doesn’t it make sense to pay an employee eight hours to count how much liquor was used from your bar so you can compare this figure to sales and determine if there are any losses? Once you have the information in front of you that is when the real bar inventory management begins.

You can analyze what sells more, are we pouring top shelf and ringing up call brands? Do I have a vodka crowd? Do we have a whisky crowd? Information is gold and proper bar inventory management will give you the edge you need.

Topics: Bar inventory, Liquor Inventory savings, bar control, inventory counting

Taking a Proper Inventory Count

 

Inventory count

Inventory CountAn inventory count can be best described as a  physical inventory of what is currently in stock in the storage areas, comparing that count to what the liquor, beer and wine inventory count software thinks is in stock, and making any necessary adjustments to get the liquor, beer and wine inventory count software to match the storage area counts.

Taking an inventory count on a regular basis will not only help us have a tighter control over our liquor, beer and wine inventory but also flag us of any discrepancies. Some inventory count software will also make you aware of any product that may have gone missing like a bottle of wine or liquor. Inventory counts will also help you better asses if you are potentially carry to much inventory that can expose you to shrinkage and tie up valuable cash flow.

Inventory counts can also be indicators of low stock levels that could lead to customer dissatisfaction and lost sales. It is important that inventory counts are performed on a regular basis. Precise inventory counts can you give you the valuable information you may need to make some decisions in your business that you may otherwise not have taken.

A perfect example can be volume rebate purchases; if you are inventory count show you are carrying too much of a certain product already, it may be prudent not pursuing a special deal, on the other end of the spectrum, an update inventory count may actually encourage a large volume purchase due to the product popularity and the need to replenish low stock level.

Topics: liquor inventory, Bar inventory, bar inventory levels, beer inventory, alcohol cost

Bar inventory system: Top 4 Questions To Ask

Scannabar Bar Inventory System If you are on the market for a bar inventory system or considering a bar inventory system to begin a better control of your liquid assets, it is best you begin to understand why you are in need of a bar inventory system. There are many bar systems out there and a simple search on the internet will bring up many.

Bar inventory systems vary in the ways they perform, but in the end, the best bar inventory system is the one that best fits the needs of your bar and the objectives you are looking to attain.

  1. How often to I plan to take a complete bar inventory?
  2. Am I taking a bar audit to keep my staff accountable daily, weekly, by shift?
  3. If I take weekly inventory of my liquor, beer and wine, what will I do with the information I gather?
  4. Can I afford a bar inventory system from a purchase perspective and do I have the internal resources to maintain it?

The purchase of a bar inventory system entails many facets and what one must realize early on is that liquor, beer and wine inventory is not a band aid on a wound, but it must become long term and relentless part of the business management for it to be successful. Once you know what your needs out, reach out to the different suppliers and ask as many questions as possible as this can be a decision that can have an extremely positive impact on your company bottom line.

Topics: Bar inventory, bar inventory levels, bar control